Humble beginnings

This post is password protected because it is neither interesting nor good work, and I don’t want anyone viewing it without me contextualizing their experience (vanity). It is simply a failsafe in case all my file storage, physical and digital, is destroyed simultaneously. I also want a record of these memories.

When I started to sense during my second semester at UT Austin that I wasn’t all that passionate about studying physics, I immediately marched to the academic advisor at the art school. I then realized I had no idea what I wanted to ask, so I just meekly said, “help?”. The advisor attempted admirably to engage with my blankness and told me about different courses of study offered in the department, and I latched on to the term “design.”

He told me that first I had to apply and be accepted into the art school, and then enter the once-a-year admissions process put on by the design division, competing with many dozens of people people for 18 spots. I distinctly recall responding, “oh, so a physics major who can’t draw probably doesn’t have a shot.”

I will always be thankful that the advisor (what’s up, Shane Sullivan?) told me that was absolutely false, and that if I could clear the hurdle of getting into the art school I would be a decent and diverse candidate for the design program. I immediately enrolled in the summer art classes I needed to squeeze in before the next semester, both in order to scrape together enough portfolio images to apply to the art school (having gone to the Texas Academy of Math and Science, I had very little to show from high school), and to catch up on the art classes prerequisite to design program admission. To make things even more complicated, I had to take those summer courses at Austin Community College, because UT art classes are only for students who’ve already been accepted to that program.

Without further ado, these are the not-so-awesome images from 8 years ago that got me into the art school that got me into design. And I’m eternally grateful. (For my sake, let’s assume my essays were slightly better.)

art school portfolio slide
High school: pencil sketch
art school portfolio slide
High school: oil pastel
art school portfolio slide
Drawing I: ink, charcoal on newsprint
art school portfolio slide
Design I: pen and ink
art school portfolio slide
Drawing I: charcoal on newsprint
art school portfolio slide
Design I: acrylic on bristol.
art school portfolio slide
Design I: acrylic on bristol
art school portfolio slide
Drawing I: charcoal on newsprint
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